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is education, and how to make higher education cheaper. how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing that you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> well, i don't think there's a number one thing, but a number of number one things, and we have to do them all. as a 21st century student, doesn't look like it. it's not just an 18-year-old that graduated high school. that still continues to be a significant part of the folks that are going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school to get a degree. that was my sister's experience. it's also the 25-year-old after ten years after being out of high school is stuck in service jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves with new skills. the great news is that technology advances are going to not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but will make it, you know, much more accessible, and with we have to ensure our student aid programs are not in the way of it. right now, we have a student aid program, the pelle grants or the loan programs, they
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
the possibility of democrats, who were doing things based on conservative ideas in the area of education, welfare, medicaid and so forth, and take all of that and elevate it and publicize it. his background, really, is in marketing. he ran a marketing company before politics, and he admits quite frankly that in the last election the conservative movement really didn't do an adequate job of explaning its ideas contributing to the losses nay took in the last election. >> senator demint had a great relationship with the tea party groups. what's that mean for the groups with the senator moving to ahead heritage? >> i think it means, bill, that he may try to take them to the next level. no one would dispute, i don't think, that the tea party has, schal we say, communication problems, and if their basic idea was to reduce the level of public spend k and in the states, i think that using the force of the analysis that senator demint and analysts at harming have at their di poe sal is there is the pos protect of the conservative movement becoming more understanding to the largely public. what can you tal
services social workers and other relationship that allows them to do with this tough issues in an educated way and resources to help. i think that is where we look at our responsibility is to help them navigate that decision. it's a personal decision and a hard decision about that decision be the family members and provider. we are believers that hospice, especially in circumstances that is not promising is the right way to do it. so you take it from a cost discussion to quality-of-life discussion. when you make the quality-of-life discussion, the cost discussion will bear out there. >> if i understand your point, it is that integrated care is what is going to lead to efficiencies to eliminate waste and bring down cost of the entire health care system. >> you probably just answer the question you're trying to ask me 50 different times. >> but devil is in the details. who's going to answer these questions to better care is provided or not? in less than someone ago that ensure insurance come in as we had to go to a primary care doctor to get permission to go to a specialist. is it the primar
thick dignities and education and the fact that there are young people alive to watch football is largely because of the people of the united states. that's kind of her difference. we've chosen a path of investment, human capital. it pays off in the long term rather than the immediacy of a football stadium. we've seen over the past several years 30 plus% decline in hiv/aids. that's not exclusively in the united states feared where the largest contributor to the end is something we should be proud of. it's huge that people in africa have that. >> last weekon monday or senator kirsten gillibrand delivered testimony on the hill and told stories of families who lost children to hurricane cindy. those hit hardest by the film testified by the senate environment and public works committee. new york, new jersey, rhode island, maryland and delaware lawmakers talked about the impact in the ongoing recovery efforts. this is two hours and 30 minutes. >> we are here today to receive testimony from members of congress. representatives and senators to represent communities that were the most
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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